digital scholarship

  • digital scholarship,  Weblogs

    Blogging was the best decision

    I have an article in the Chronicle of Higher Education. I was asked to write a piece about the role of blogging in academic life. In many ways this is a tad quaint, blogging is hardly the new kid on the block (indeed it is now ripe for the X is dead meme). But maybe that's the point, it's been around long enough that we can assess its impact in real terms, and not just as the new shiny thing. My approach was to take blogging as a representative for new forms of scholarship, and how it had impacted upon my practice.  There is nothing in it that will be…

  • digital scholarship,  innovation,  openness

    The role of respectable idiots

    <Image http://www.flickr.com/photos/aussiegall/6846455366/> I gave a talk at the Higher Education Academy 'New Places to Learn' seminar yesterday about openness and the institution. I was proposing that in order to facilitate openness you need a combination of a top-down and bottom-up process. So for example, OER projects such as OpenLearn, combined with creating the space for academics to generate and share their own content (eg by recognising digital artefacts in promotion). One aspect I raised for creating the environment within which academics engage in openness of their own free will is the role of the 'respectable idiot'. This is a person who has a degree of respect within the institution as a…

  • digital scholarship

    10 Digital Scholarship Lessons in 10 Videos

    I’ve given a talk with this title 3 or 4 times recently, so thought I’d best get around to blogging it. In the presentation I caution that you shouldn’t really trust people who give lessons about the future – they’re usually trying to sell you something. But lessons is a nice way to frame it, so treat them more as opinions I’ve come to over the past couple of years. Lesson 1: It’s not just for geeks It is easy sometimes to get bogged down in conversations about the latest technology, API calls, RSS feeds, linked-data, etc and it seems very technical. Sometimes this has the effect of making academics…

  • digital scholarship,  Music

    Punk, Queen & New Romantics in digital scholarship

    It may be tired after the whole edupunk thing (curses to you Groom!), and has more than a whiff of old men reliving their youth about it, but nevertheless I'd like to revisit punk music as an analogy for current changes in ed tech. This time it is nothing to do with the approach or the values, but rather the lesson of what a revolution actually look like. In his book From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg, John Naughton makes the point that we are living through the midst of a revolution, and it's very difficult to see what the outcome will be. While I think that digital, networked and open approaches…

  • digital scholarship

    Levels of friction in sharing

    Over the past week or so I've had a couple of twitter discussions around 'frictionless sharing'. Brian Kelly captured some of this discussion in Storify and then followed up with this post (like a dog with a bone, Brian has also created a wikipedia stub 🙂 The term has been somewhat corrupted by Facebook, which has inevitably led to it being rather sneered at. Particularly worrying I think is unintentional sharing, ie Facebook simply broadcasting your actions. Sharing should always be a conscious decision I feel.  Pete Johnston made the point about context, which is another concern around frictionless sharing. Consider the following examples: 1) You 'favourite' a number of offensive tweets…

  • digital scholarship,  Open content

    Yeah, but who pays?

    My colleague, Gill Kirkup, asks this question of digital scholarship, and it is a frequent refrain of Alan Cann's. It's a good question, and one I usually try to have an answer for. I don't think I am guilty of Gill's charge of hoping for the "internet equivalent of the tooth fairy". In fact, one of my complaints about the current academic publishing model is that it's a poor economic one. Now, one can make many arguments about open access that don't address the economics, for example around it being a public good, or a more effective way of working for instance, many of which are compelling in their own…

  • digital scholarship,  Research

    Ten digital scholarship questions for researchers

    <Image http://www.flickr.com/photos/elycefeliz/3262326159/> In my talk the other day for the Change MOOC, and in my book, I argue that digital scholarship has the potential to alter the way we conduct research, or at least to add some new tools to the toolbox. Now checklists should be treated with even more caution than a finding that 3D improves learning, so take this as some things to think about rather than a definite checklist you can submit to your research funder. I'd be interested to hear of other suggestions, and also whether this is all stuff people are doing anyway. My feeling is that when it comes to writing research proposals we're all…

  • digital scholarship

    Digital scholarship = unspoiled holiday destination

    <Image http://www.flickr.com/photos/sanjibm/3306287621/ by Sanjibm> At last week's digital scholarship debate Rory McGreal raised a point that has often nagged at me. He said he didn't want blogs and other forms of outputs to be recognised, not because they weren't part of scholarly activity, but because he didn't want them to go the same way as journal articles. There is something in this – we have refined and controlled the writing process to such a degree that it is not a very pleasurable activity. Sometimes writing a good paper does feel as though you are doing something creative and worthwhile, but often there is an element of duty about it ("I need to get…

  • conference,  digital scholarship,  Presentation

    Digital scholarship recognition – the debate

    So, I was the invited keynote debater at this year's EdMedia conference in Lisbon. I had ten minutes to put my case in favour of the following motion: "This house believes that in the next decade, digital scholarship (in open journals, blogs, and social media) will achieve the same status in academic settings as traditional scholarship" My (poor quality, one take audio) slidecast is below. Digital scholarship debate View another webinar from Martin Weller My argument was that there are a number of converging pressures which will make recognition inevitable. These were: 1) Impact 2) Efficiency 3) Efficacy 4) Complementarity 5) Institutional benefit 6) Variety 7) Human factors Antonio Figueiredo…

  • Books,  bookthinks,  digital scholarship,  digscholbook

    The book isn’t dead, it just has new friends

    So the first of my reflections on completing my digital scholarship book can probably be filed under 'No shit, Sherlock': The book is a good format for some ideas  I have suggested that books and articles have had a monopoly as the format for the dissemination of ideas, and new media liberate us from this somewhat. In my case the book has grown out of stuff I've been blogging over the past 4 years or so, but it isn't just a load of blog posts bundled together (whatever you may think). The length and format of a book is a very good means of both exploring ideas in depth and…

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