Valuing emotional intelligence

Free Hugs, Coachella 2013 -- Indio, CA

I have the real privilege of being the lead on the GO-GN project, which if you don’t know, is a global network of OER doctoral researchers. It is by far the project I get the most from, since you see the real impact it has on people. Our members often talk about how much joining GO-GN has meant to them, using phrases like ‘finding my tribe’, ‘feeling like a member of a family’, ‘I no longer felt alone’.

A very important aspect of GO-GN is helping researchers develop intellectually, such as selecting conceptual frameworks, refining their methodology, sharpening research questions, etc. But, as the quotes above indicate, as important (if not more) is the emotional component of the project. Recently our fantastic Project Manager, Natalie Eggleston, left the OU, and this has made me reflect on the significance of this role. I’m sure all GO-GN members would acknowledge how significant the contribution is of people like Nats, and also the members themselves who offer this support to each other.

GO-GN is a project that supports doctoral researchers, and it’s a cliche but nonetheless true, that a PhD is a personal journey. So maybe the emotional aspect is greater in our project than others, but I would argue that is a vital element in all projects. If you’re conducting a European research on, say, credentialing guidelines for informal learning across Europe, then the manner in which those project partners connect with each other will have a significant impact on the overall performance of the project.

Yet, emotional intelligence is rarely an acknowledged part of any project. In truth, it’s easier to replace me in GO-GN than Natalie. Part of the problem is that measuring non-emotional stuff is easier. This brings us back to the issue around recognising certain types of labour because we can measure them, and (surprise!) the work that is less well recognised is often more likely to be undertaken by women. What is the KPI for emotional support – Number of hugs given?

I don’t have a solution to this (that seems to be a common refrain on here), but I want to recognise the contribution of people like Natalie who are often not those listed on publications, and the significance of emotional intelligence in a project.

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