How to sell soul to a soulless people

This was the question posed by Public Enemy back in 2007. Apple’s answer is to put U2’s album on everyone’s iPhone. This has been commented about endlessly, but I was interested by my own reaction when I saw it there. I felt something akin to revulsion. Now I know logically that I can just delete it, what’s the big deal. And I also know apps push stuff at me all the time, so what’s the difference here?

Pondering my own reaction (and that of many others), I think the answer is that music is related to identity. I posted many years ago that digital formats changed our sense of ownership, and that owning music used to be a strong part of your identity. “Look through my record collection” used to be an invite to get to know someone better. This has undoubtedly changed, one has only to consider what it’s like to be a Spotify customer where you have immediate access to just about every record ever made. Selection and ownership are less important then.

But I think what Apple failed to understand (or understood perfectly well, but didn’t care), is that your music library still feels like yours. On Twitter people pointed out to me that I didn’t own a phone, but rather rented a content delivery service. But I still feel like that library is mine. I’ve chosen what goes in there. I know no-one else cares, but it’s like your real library at home, those books have been selected by you. Some you may hate, some you may not have finished, some relate to a specific point in your life, and so on. But they are an extension of who you are. Having someone else place items in your music library feels far more intrusive than pushing an advert at me, or sending me a notification because it is eroding a sense of identity. And the more I think about it, the more I believe that tools that help us establish and define that identity in a digital age are the ones that will be successful. Apple demonstrated that their belief is that the only identity to have is theirs, and for such a modern company, that seems an old-fashioned view.

Now, if they had put this track on everyone’s iPhone, I wonder what the reaction would’ve been:

3 Comments

  1. Paul says:

    Nice to hear Chuck singing hippie anthems and name-checking two dozen Dylan songs – that’s my reaction.

  2. macurcher says:

    I share the sense of revulsion, only made worse by the fact that Apple are killing the Classic iPod, the device that did allow me to have “1000 songs in my pocket” – my songs, my choices, my identity. That is why I prefer to listen to music and audiobooks from my iPod rather than from my phone or stream something. I stream to listen to something new, then buy to put it into my collection.

    I honestly feel my iPod is a legacy item for my daughters as it reflect me, the music and books that I listened to, that I though were worth buying. I hope the U2 thing was a mistake they will regret.

  3. Kev says:

    It turns out it’s not even easy to remove. Apple have had to create a removal tool:

    https://buy.itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZFinance.woa/wa/offerOptOut?at=10l6Xd&ct=if3xfxqaveci

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